How long is grass seed stored for

How long is grass seed good for?

Many homeowners buy extra bags when buying grass seeds for a backyard, garden or lawn. And naturally, they store these extra packets of seeds in the garage or the storeroom so that these can be used later. But how long is grass seed good for in a closed bag? 

The germination rate of grass seeds decreases over time. So, it is essential to know precisely how long the grass seeds will be stored. This guide provides all the information related to grass seed storage, expired duration and germination rate. So, let’s start with us.

How long is grass seed suitable for?

This answer is not as easy as you think because it may vary depending on several factors. For example, seed germination depends more on your seed preservation method, timing and surrounding conditions. In that case, some seeds can last up to one year, and some seeds can last up to 5 years. 

As per the lawn leader Scotts, older grass seed can longer-last up to two-three years with a proper storage process. Note that some germination rates tend to decrease each year. So, it is best practice to use a stored grass seed within one year.

How to store grass seed correctly?

Storing your grass seed in the correct container with proper cold temperature can retain the freshness and germination rate. And you can get a good seed after a long time. Let’s find out how to store seeds properly.

Moisture:

Too much moisture can cause fungal growth in the seed. So, it is recommended to avoid too much moisture when storing. Good to know the ideal moisture level is 60%.

Containers:

The size of the container would be perfect as per the amount of the seed. As well as make sure about the container seal so that the outer moisture can’t come into the container. 

Ventilation:

Store grass seed pot in a well-ventilated room to ensure constant air for grass seed. Always avoid enclosed and damp places to store seeds. 

Temperature:

The temperature of the seed storage area should not be too cold or too hot. So, try to store your grass seed at a constant temperature that would be 60 °F. 

Packaging:

Use the right size and material bag for the seed. You can use a cloth bag. Put some soda in a bit container and store it in the seed bag. It can help to maintain moisture and temperature. 

stored grass seed

FAQ: 

How do you know if your stored grass seed is still good?

A simple water test can help you to know the seed germination rate. So, take a glass of water and put some grass seed into the glass. Then wait for 15 minutes and notice if the seed is a sink, then it is viable. And if the seeds are floating, then the seed is not viable. 

Is it good to plant old grass seed?

Germination of old grass seeds is low. It is better to apply much amount in the case of old grass seed. Otherwise, it doesn’t provide a good result. Besides, you can analyze old grass seed with a simple water test then plant it for better results. 

How long does grass seed keep for?

How many years is grass seed good for? The lawn leader Scotts has said that grass seed can keep good for two years or three years. In a different case, old grass seed can be destroyed within one year. And some rare cases, these would be good up to five years. But the germination will decrease each year. 

How long can you keep grass seed in a bag?

How long is grass seed good for in the bag? first of all, you need to know that grass seeds are much better in a closed bag than in an open bag. For instance, grass seed in an opened bag can last up to the 18th month. On the contrary, grass seed in an unopened bag can last up to five years. 

Final Words:

So, have you cleared now about how long is grass seed good for? Although the germination rate will decrease, grass seed can be good for a long time. It mainly depends on your seed preservation methods. 

Also, note that grass seeds can be longer for maximum time if you can put them in a sealed bag and a cool and dry environment. An opened bag and hot temperature can destroy grass seed soon.

Jonathan L. Leon
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